OMG!

Ranch on top of mill buildingAnother warm day this winter, and out for a Saturday walk. I go to what is one of the busiest places in the city – the corner of Garden and State – with throngs of passersby going to either the library, or the Institution for Savings.
 
This has always been one of my most favorite vantage points complete with benches. Looking down Stately State, we see a gorgeous bank front, a recently completed and tasteful clock tower, a beautiful 18th century sea captain’s mansion, a lovely 20th century library so skillfully blended in, and (behind us) the impeccable Dalton House. Probably one of the premier vantage points in the city, encompassing some of the best 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st (if you include the clock tower) century amalgams of architecture.
 
Until recently.
 
I was aghast at the gash we unwittingly allowed on our fair city. Can anyone look at this picture and not feel horrified! It’s a crime that the city allowed this to be built – even over the objections of neighbors. At the time, I (like many) was assuaged by the public statement “you won’t be able to see it from State Street” — only now realizing that is true IF YOU ARE IN A MOVING CAR. But we are a walking city. And one of the most gorgeous views has been bastardized.
 
A 1950s ranch on top of an 1850s building? A pox on all our houses!
 
And no clearer reason why we need the Historic District NOW! Too bad it’s too late for this one street corner view….
 
– A fellow contributor on the subject of historic preservation 
www.ppreservationist.com
Contributing submissions on the historic downtown, historic preservation issues and open space concerns will be taken in strictest confidentiality.   I reserve the right to post contributions that add to the discussions and will not post the name of the contributor unless specifically instructed to do so. I of course can not without permission post copyrighted materials.
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About P. Preservationist

Dedicated to the Enrichment & Preservation of Newburyport
This entry was posted in Developers, Downtown, Heritage Tourism, Local Historic Districts (LHD), Tourism. Bookmark the permalink.

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